Quick Answer: Is The Last 4 Digits Of SSN PII?

What are the last four digits of your SSN?

Social Security NumbersThe first set of three digits is called the Area Number.The second set of two digits is called the Group Number.The final set of four digits is the Serial Number..

How do I find the last four digits of my SSN?

Get the last 4 digits of your Social Security number for free!Look at your Social Security card.Look at your last year’s US Federal Income Tax return.Look at any form W-2 you have.Look at any form 1099 you have.Sign in to your My Social Security Account and click on My Profile.

What is not PII?

Non-personally identifiable information (non-PII) is data that cannot be used on its own to trace, or identify a person, so basically the opposite of PII. Examples of non-PII include, but are not limited to: Device IDs. Cookies.

How can you help protect PII against unauthorized use?

Protect e-mails that contain PII (e.g., encryption). Do not upload PII to unauthorized websites (e.g., wikis). Do not use unauthorized mobile devices to access PII. Lock up portable devices (e.g., laptops, cell phones).

What can someone do with the last 4 digits of your debit card?

If you call your bank, or a government agency, they may ask for the last four of your social. With just that information, they won’t be able to open a new account in your name anywhere, or charge anything to your card.

Is PII a location?

Whereas, personal information in the context of the GDPR also references data such as: photographs, social media posts, preferences and location as personal. PII is any information that can be used to identify a person.

What qualifies as PII?

Further, PII is defined as information: (i) that directly identifies an individual (e.g., name, address, social security number or other identifying number or code, telephone number, email address, etc.) or (ii) by which an agency intends to identify specific individuals in conjunction with other data elements, i.e., …

What is considered sensitive PII?

Sensitive PII (SPII) is Personally Identifiable Information, which if lost, compromised, or disclosed without authorization, could result in substantial harm, embarrassment, inconvenience, or unfairness to an individual.

Who is responsible for protecting PII?

From a legal perspective, the responsibility for protecting PII may range from no responsibility to being the sole responsibility of an organization. Generally, the responsibility is shared with the organization holding the PII and the individual owner of the data. That said, while you might not be legally responsible.

What are examples of PII?

Personally identifiable information, or PII, is any data that could potentially be used to identify a particular person. Examples include a full name, Social Security number, driver’s license number, bank account number, passport number, and email address.

What is the difference between PII and personal data?

A personal data is considered as anonymized if it does not relate to an identified or identifiable natural person or if it has been rendered anonymous in such a manner that the data subject is not or no longer identifiable. … PII includes any information that can be used to re-identify anonymous data.

Is SSN a PII?

Some forms of PII are sensitive as stand-alone elements. … Examples of stand-alone PII include: Social Security Numbers (SSN), driver’s license or state identification number; Alien Registration Numbers; financial account number; and biometric identifiers such as fingerprint, voiceprint, or iris scan.

Can someone do anything with the last 4 digits of SSN?

Not only can they open credit in your name, steal your money and government benefits, they can also obtain medical care and tax refunds in your name. Guard your “Final Four.” Although they are widely used and shared, the last four digits of your SSN are the most important to protect.

Why do recruiters ask for last 4 digits of SSN?

For most of these companies they require the last four digits of your Social Security Number(***-**-1234) and the Month and Day of your Birth (01/01/****). This helps those VMS systems to create unique identifiers to track what jobs you have applied to, interviews and those results, departments, locations, etc.